Java, Sumatra, and the Other Islands of the Dutch East Indies Antoine Cabaton

ISBN: 9781230230894

Published: September 12th 2013

Paperback

126 pages


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Java, Sumatra, and the Other Islands of the Dutch East Indies  by  Antoine Cabaton

Java, Sumatra, and the Other Islands of the Dutch East Indies by Antoine Cabaton
September 12th 2013 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | 126 pages | ISBN: 9781230230894 | 10.62 Mb

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER IVMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER IV ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISIONS OF JAVA The seventeen Residencies.--The western Residencies: Bantam, Batavia, Cheribon, the Preangers.--II.

The central Residencies: Pekalongan, Samarang, Banjumas, Kedu.--III. Kedu and BoroBudur.--IV. The Vorsienlanden, or Principalities, Surakarta and Djokjakarta.--V. Rembang, Madiun.--VI. The Residencies of the East: Surabaja, Kediri, Pasuruan, Besuki, and Madura. I. The immense area of Java and Madura was, until 1900, divided into twenty-two Residencies or Provinces, which have since been reduced to seventeen- partly as a measure of centralisation, but still more as a matter of administrative economy.

Two of these, in the centre of Java, have retained an apparent independence- one under a Susuhunan,1 and the other under a Sultan. These are known as the Vorstenlanden, or Principalities: Surakarta and Djokjakarta. The first Residency in Java, starting from the western extremity of the island, is that of Bantam- which, after having been the most flourishing of all, is to-day perhaps the poorest.

Bantam, the capital of the old Sultanate of Bantam, was indeed the centre of the Dutch power until the foundation of Batavia, being better situated, at the crossing of the maritime highways, and having a better protected road 1 Or, being abridged, sunan. A title which, in ancient Javanese, more or less precisely signifies his Holiness- it used to be given only to princes who united in their hands both the spiritual and the temporal powers. m stead. Bantam, for nearly fifty years, was the great European port- to-day it is only a poor native town, living by a small trade in fruits and agricultural products with Batavia, and, on the other side of the strait, with its Sumatrese neighbours of the Lampong country....



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